OrientGIS Projects

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OrientGIS.net is a research website about a networked approach to GIS applied to near eastern landscapes and sites. We aim at creating visual tools for studying and characterizing ancient societies and their environments, building on materials acquired or designed by our research group or processed after downloading, receiving or scanning them with due credit from various sources. OrientGIS has no commercial purposes whatsoever, its only drive being the sharing of duly credited scientific information. The website – based on the PostgreSQL and Geonode open source projects – is run by the Chair of Near Eastern Archaeology of the Department of History and Cultures, Bologna University and is open to the cooperation of all interested scholars and students. The Editor is Nicolò Marchetti, the Web engineer Stefano Bassetto and the Webmaster Valentina Orrù.
Networked GIS in Archaeology describes an approach based on collaboration and inclusiveness among scholars and scientific institutions alike, acknowledging that the scale of the scientific approaches and the challenges posed to historical landscapes by modern socio-economic development exceeds individual capabilities for responding, implementing and managing them. We believe that complex contextual information and multi-disciplinary datasets require specific digital environments for proper display, integration and exploitation. To meet these needs, one must build a cyberinfrastructure to record the full array of data produced in the field as born digital data, to process remote sensing elaborations and to publish the primary information on the web in open access format and through new architectures of knowledge. This networked perspective will enable the community to critically join in the modelling and explanation processes, leading to rapid improvements in research agendas and queries. [NM]

OrientGIS Projects

EblaChora

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Islahiye Valley

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QADIS

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OrientDams

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EblaChora

About
The case of Ebla in northern Syria is certainly one of the most favourable ones for enhancing our understanding of mechanisms of functioning of the early state. The discovery, in 1975, of royal archives consisting of 17.000 cuneiform tablets dating to c. 2300 BC has supplied the scientific community with an invaluable mass of documents dealing with all aspects of state organization. Further, considerable progresses during the past decade have been made at Ebla in seriating material culture assemblages, in interpreting the rich evidence retrieved for ancient visual communication and in exposing the urban structure of that period. A unique opportunity to test theories and models about the rise and structure of the early state by expanding the level of analysis to the landscape around Ebla is currently being envisaged within the Ebla Chora Project (ECP), with the aim of building a multi-tier explanatory pattern which can be applied to, or utilized for, other early foci of urbanization in the Near East or elsewhere.

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OrientGIS Projects